Science

About Our Science Curriculum
Science Curriculum
 

Science in the national curriculum has the following aims, for children to:

  • develop scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics (though not necessarily understanding these specific terms initially)

 

  • develop understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science through different types of science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them

 

  • are equipped with the scientific knowledge required to understand the uses and implications of science, today and for the future 

 

The science curriculum is divided into these two key areas:

 

  1. Scientific enquiry or working scientifically – understanding how to explore and investigate all aspects of science; understanding the nature, processes and methods of science (this strand of science runs across all other specific strands)
  2. scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding on a variety of scientific themes as follows:
  • Years 1/2: plants, animals (including humans), everyday materials and their uses, seasonal changes, living things and their habitats;
  • Years 3/4: plants, animals (including humans – nutrition, skeletons, muscles), rocks and soils, states of matter, light and sound, forces and magnets, electricity, living things and their habitats
  • Years 5/6: animals (including humans – ages and stages, and evolution and inheritance), properties and changes of materials, earth in space, forces, living things and their habitats, light, electricity.

 

    Please Click on The Early Years and Science Long Term Mapping

 

Exploring close up

Our youngest children learn about Science first hand; through play activities inside and outside the classroom, and also on their regular visits within the Local Area and to City Museum and Science Learning Centres. They learn to look out for similarities and differences and patterns and seasonal change in nature. They learn to appreciate the natural world and also develop an understanding of life cycles.

This is then built on through the rest of the school, as we seek to keep children naturally inquisitive and excited about the world around them, as they try to make sense of things and understanding scientific processes and principles. From Early Years all the way through to Year 6 – all pupils are given the opportunity to work scientifically with practical resources each term. Pupils are actively encouraged by all teachers to ask, predict, design and test their own Science questions.

During March, The ASE British Science Week is now an annual fixture in our school calendar. The focus for Science Week 2019 was ‘Journeys.’

 

Our Science Curriculum

 

A high quality science education provides the foundations for understanding the world through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics. Science has changed our lives and is vital to the world’s future prosperity, and all pupils should be taught essential aspects of the knowledge, methods, processes and uses of science.

 

Through building up a body of key foundational knowledge and concepts, all pupils should be encouraged to recognise the power of rational explanation and develop a sense of excitement and curiosity about natural phenomena. They should be encouraged to understand how science can be used to explain what is occurring, predict how things will behave, and observe scientific changes.

 

Spoken Language Skills in Science

The national curriculum for science reflects the importance of spoken language in pupils’ development across the whole curriculum – cognitively, socially and linguistically. The quality and variety of language that pupils hear and speak are key factors in developing their scientific vocabulary and articulating scientific concepts clearly and precisely. They must be assisted in making their thinking clear, both to themselves and to others, and teachers should ensure that pupils build secure foundations by using discussion to probe and remedy their misconceptions.

 

The Science Curriculum 

Key Stage 1: 

The principal focus of science teaching in key stage 1 is to enable pupils to experience and observe phenomena, looking more closely at the natural and humanly-constructed world around them. They should be encouraged to be curious and ask questions about what they notice. They should be helped to develop their understanding of scientific ideas by using different types of scientific enquiry to answer their own questions, including observing changes over a period of time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out simple comparative tests, and finding things out using secondary sources of information. They should begin to use simple scientific language to talk about what they have found out and communicate their ideas to a range of audiences in a variety of ways. Most of the learning about science should be done through the use of first-hand practical experiences, but there should also be some use of appropriate secondary sources, such as books, photographs and technology.

‘Working scientifically’ is described separately in the programme of study, but must always be taught through and clearly related to the teaching of substantive science content in the programme of study.

Pupils should read and spell scientific vocabulary at a level consistent with their increasing word reading and spelling knowledge at key stage 1.

Lower Key Stage 2 – Year 3 and Year 4: 

The principal focus of science teaching in lower key stage 2 is to enable pupils to broaden their scientific view of the world around them. They should do this through exploring, talking about, testing and developing ideas about everyday phenomena and the relationships between living things and familiar environments, and by beginning to develop their ideas about functions, relationships and interactions.

They should ask their own questions about what they observe and make some decisions about which types of scientific enquiry are likely to be the best ways of answering them, including observing changes over time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out simple comparative and fair tests and finding things out using secondary sources of information. They should draw simple conclusions and use some scientific language, first, to talk about and, later, to write about what they have found out.

‘Working scientifically’ is described separately at the beginning of the programme of study, but must always be taught through and clearly related to substantive science content in the programme of study. Pupils should read and spell scientific vocabulary.

 

 

 

Upper Key Stage 2 – Year 5 and Year 6:

The principal focus of science teaching in upper key stage 2 is to enable pupils to develop a deeper understanding of a wide range of scientific ideas. They should do this through exploring and talking about their ideas; asking their own questions about scientific phenomena; and analysing functions, relationships and interactions more systematically.

At upper key stage 2, they should encounter more abstract ideas and begin to recognise how these ideas help them to understand and predict how the world operates. They should also begin to recognise that scientific ideas change and develop over time. They should select the most appropriate ways to answer science questions using different types of scientific enquiry, including observing changes over different periods of time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out comparative and fair tests and finding things out using a wide range of secondary sources of information. Pupils should draw conclusions based on their data and observations, use evidence to justify their ideas, and use their scientific knowledge and understanding to explain their findings.

Measuring rain in Year 1!

As part of our Science topic 'Seasonal Change', Mrs Gaughan asked us to measure how much rain falls in a week in July. We knew that as July is in Summer there would not be a lot of rain but she asked us to investigate anyway. Using recycled materials such as glass and...

Science Week in Year 6

Year 6 had a fantastic week during Science Week. We explored the science theme of Journeys including: Electric Journeys, Journeys through the Earth and Beyond and Journeys through Nature. Have a look at some of our pictures to find out what we did.  We also found out...

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